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Showing 4 posts from June 2013.

“The Goat Ate My Equine Activity Liability Act Warning Sign”

Equine Activity Liability Acts, now found in 46 states, frequently include requirements that “equine activity professionals” and sometimes “equine activity sponsors” post warning signs on the premises. One example of such a sign, from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, states:

WARNING

Under Massachusetts law, an equine professional is not liable for an injury to, or the death of, a participant in equine activities resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities, pursuant to section 2D of chapter 128 of the General Laws.

But what happens if the “warning” sign falls off or disappears? Will the “equine activity professional” lose benefits from the equine activity liability act? Read More ›

Categories: Liability

How to (Legally) Brand Your Horse

Why Do States Regulate Brands?

The reasons for state government regulation of livestock brands are just as valid today as they were a century ago. States regulate brands to protect the integrity of a given brand, to avoid confusing the public by having two farms with nearly identical brands, to give notice that a brand has been "taken" in order to fend off others who might want to claim a similar design, and sometimes to help identify the owner or breeder of the branded animal (comparable to a permanent "dog tag"). Read More ›

Categories: Regulatory

Letting Someone Ride Your Horse? Consider the Legalities

“Can I borrow your horse?” We hear this question from friends, acquaintances, co-workers, and relatives. When we answer “yes,” what usually follows is a fun and pleasurable experience. Sometimes, however, the opposite holds true, someone is hurt, and a lawsuit follows.

This article briefly discusses why people sue others who lend out horses and offers some suggestions for horse owners to try to protect themselves. Read More ›

Categories: Insurance, Liability

Why Horse Owners Need Written Training Contracts

You are leaving your horse with a horse trainer who comes well-recommended but has no experience working with you. Can you trust this person to give your horse humane treatment? If your horse sustains an injury during training, will the trainer keep you informed? Will your horse receive adequate turn-out?

You can leave these matters to guesswork. Or, you can insist on a training contract. Read More ›

Categories: Contracts, Liability

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Our Equine law blog (and its author) in the news!

Julie Fershtman, author of our popular and prolific Equine Law Blog, was interviewed by the State Bar of Michigan. The interview, which called Fershtman "Lawyer-Blogger," discussed our Equine Law Blog. We truly believe that this blog is the nation's most active blog serving the equine industry on equine law topics, and we thank you for visiting it. Read more here.

Honors & Recognitions

Equine lawyer, Julie Fershtman, has received these prestigious equine industry awards from respected equine organizations:

"Excellence in the Advancement of Animal Law Award" - American Bar Association Tort Trial & Insurance Law Section Animal Law Committee

"Distinguished Service Award" - American Youth Horse Council

"Industry Service Award" - Michigan Equine Partnership

"Catalyst Award"- Michigan Horse Council

"Outstanding Achievement Award" - American Riding Instructors Association 

"Partner in Safety Award" - American Riding Instructors Association 

"Associate Service Award" - United Professional Horseman's Association

"National Partnership in Safety" Award" - Certified Horsemanship Association 

What our Equine Law Services can Provide

Handling breach of contract, fraud/ misrepresentation, commercial code, and other claims involving equine-related transactions including purchases/sales, leases, mare leases/foal transfers, and partnerships.

Litigating disputes in court or through alternative dispute resolution (arbitration, mediation, facilitation).

Defending equine/farm/equestrian industry professionals,  businesses, and associations in personal injury claims and lawsuits.

Drafting and negotiating contracts for boarding, training, sales, waivers/releases, leases, and numerous other equine-related transactions.

Representing and advising insurers on  coverage and policy language as well as litigation;

Advising equine industry clubs and associations regarding management, rules, bylaws, disputes, and regulations.

Representing some of the equine industry's top trainers, competitors, stables, and associations.

Counseling industry professionals, stable managers, and individual horse owners. 

THE NATION'S MOST SOUGHT-AFTER EQUINE LAW SPEAKER

Did you know Julie Fershtman has spoken at the American Horse Council Annual Meeting, Equine Affaire, Midwest Horse Fair, Equitana USA, US Dressage Federation Annual Meeting, North American Riding for the Handicapped (now PATH International) Annual Meeting, American Morgan Horse Association Annual Meeting, American Paint Horse Association Annual Meeting, US Pony Clubs, Inc.'s Annual Meeting, All-American Quarter Horse Congress, American Youth Horse Council Annual Meeting, American Riding Instructors Association Annual Meeting, CHA Annual Meeting, and numerous others? Consider signing her up for your convention. Contact Julie.

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